Book Review: Seasons in the Garden

Through books, writers can share wisdom and their life experiences with others. Judging from the following comments, Seasons in the Garden, by Sandra Fischer, is one of those books that does this successfully and in a manner that readers appreciate. 

 

About the Author:

Book photo promo2

Sandra Fischer taught high school English and owned a Christian bookstore in Indiana before she retired and moved to the Carolinas. Her stories and articles are gleaned from her life experiences growing up in Indiana. Her book, Seasons in the Garden, is inspired by living fifteen years in South Carolina.   

 

 

What people are saying: 

 

book cover

“This is a beautifully written book by a talented writer. How she used the seasons of the year connected to gardens is so inspiring. I read it through once and now I’m reading it each morning for inspiration. It is amazing how it connects with life with different journeys I travel. I love it so much I am giving it to friends for birthdays and Christmas…truly a treasure to share.” –Charlene Kinelski

“What a beautiful book. Every page is filled with inspiration. It allows you to look at everyday life from a new perspective. A great gift for friends and family.” – Susan Blackburn

“A beautiful book you will thoroughly enjoy even if you are not a gardener! Sandi has a wonderful way of inspiring her readers……get one for a friend!” – Jean Jones

“This book, filled with scripture and quotes from literature, would make a fine gift to a friend or to oneself! Noting that our lives parallel the seasons of the earth, the author writes about the splendor and riches to be found in nature and in our lives, if we only look for them. Original photographs and artwork beautifully illustrate the text.” – Gwen Myers

 

To learn more about Sandra Fischer and her writing visit:

Amazon Author Page 

Faithwriters

Blog 

 

Thanks for reading! Please visit Sandra on her social media and leave her an encouraging message. Or leave a message here! Let’s encourage one another with simple acts of support and kindness.

Blessings!

–Delia

Mini-Devotional on God’s Sovereignty

For those of you who don’t know, I often share my thoughts on the Bible or life experiences on Instagram by means of posting mini-devotionals. To see them, look me up at: Christian.Creative.Nexus.

Tonight, I read a great devotional by Francis Chan called Letters to the Church. Click here to read my comments and reflections on it. Bonus: it’s a short read!

When Christian Writers Face a Writing Crash: repost

I’m thrilled and feel so blessed that Christian Writing Today has published my guest post tackling a subject that many Christian writers (and creatives) struggle with: discouragement. I invite you to clink here to read the post.

Blessings!

Not Living Up to the World’s Standards

Not Living Up to the World’s Standards

by Lela Markham

 

What makes a Christian creative a Christian?

I had to ask myself that question recently when someone with an axe to grind posted a review of one of my books that said, in essence, that I wasn’t a Christian because I don’t think the Army would walk on water and hand out flowers during the Apocalypse.

Sigh.

I grew up and now live in a very military town. About one-quarter of my friends and family are either in the military or were once in the military. I know some lovely military people. I also have had plenty of experience with jerks who were jacked up on the power of being in the military. There’s that dichotomy in human nature that doesn’t go away if you ignore it. The Transformation Project series focuses on how ordinary people, including military and civilian authorities, react in an apocalyptic situation where their command structure has been fractured. I don’t show all individuals with military authority acting in a heroic manner because I personally know people who wouldn’t act honorably in a situation where they’re given that kind of power and no oversight.  The news has covered some of these people. I believe there would be more of them if the command structure that is in place no longer existed. I have other military characters who do act honorably … and some of them die for that stand. That’s the only defense I’m going to offer.

Circling back to my original theme of “in the world, but not of it” … must Christian creatives stand for certain secular societal norms or be deemed “not Christian”?

Being a Christian is defined by one thing. You can discover it in Romans 10:9-10.

If you declare with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. 10 For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you profess your faith and are saved.

Do you believe that Jesus Christ is God, Savior of mankind and your soul and do you confess that publicly? Your lifestyle should adhere to that and your politics are part of your lifestyle. Whether you support the military, love policemen, eat apple pie, or spend Mother’s Day with your mom isn’t really addressed in the Bible, therefore, they are personal decisions that each of us make individually.

“Art, though, is never the voice of a country; it is an even more precious thing, the voice of the individual, doing its best to speak, not comfort of any sort, but truth. And the art that speaks it most unmistakably, most directly, most variously, most fully, is fiction; in particular, the novel.” ~ Eudora Welty in On Writing.

Writing a novel is about addressing truth as the author sees it. A lot of Christians are very supportive of conservative political causes that I can’t find anywhere in the Bible. There’s nothing wrong with that – most of the time. We live in this world and the politics of the secular world affects us. When my taxes go up, I have less money to give to the church, which I feel spends social welfare funds much more wisely than the government does. I vote accordingly. We should all care if a politician believes it is okay to kill babies in the womb. We should pray for people caught up in the cycle of drug addiction or alcoholism, pornography or polyamory. The Bible is clear on many issues that Christians ought to have an opinion on and the Bible tells us what that opinion should be.

The Bible is less clear on our involvement in those secular programs designed to address some of the world’s evils. I harbor doubts about how Jesus would feel about some secular programs American Christians are expected to support simply because we’re expected to support them. As a Christian creative who wants to reach a larger audience than just Christians who read religiously-oriented literature, I have given serious thought to which subjects for which I’m willing to fall on my authorial sword. I made a commitment to show Christian characters as human … with flaws, while showing their beliefs respectfully. I have every admiration for our Savior, not always the same feeling toward His followers. I try to show the world as I see it and not as I would like it to be, recognizing that it is fallen and so are the people in it. And, yet, I struggle with where the lines are because it’s not so simple as the Christian publishers make it seem. Because I’ve rejected those made-up constraints, I have to set new ones of my own – ones that I hope are Biblically-based, but not ignoring this world as it really is.

What about you? If you’re a Christian creative trying to reach a secular audience, do you find it difficult to push the “Christian” boundaries in a Christ-centric way without upsetting the “standards” people have applied to Christian creatives?

 

28721822_1972311923031983_1933873618_nLela Markham is the pen name of an Alaskan novelist who was raised in a home built of books. Alaska is a grand adventure like none other with a culture that embraces summer adventure and winter artistic pursuits.

 

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